555 timer ic

555 Timer IC Schematic Circuit Diagram

The 555 timer IC is an integrated circuit used in a variety of timer, delay, pulse generation, and oscillator applications. Derivatives provide two or four timing circuits in one package. The design was first marketed in 1972 by Signetics. [Wikipedia]

The 555 timer IC is an 8-pin dip plastic packaging chip. Many electronic component makers now manufacture it in significant quantities. Because it is a flexible IC that can be used to create a wide range of applications, it is highly popular among electronic design engineers, workers, students, and hobbyists.

555 Timer IC Schematic Circuit Diagram

Around 27 transistors and 10 to 15 resistors are found in each 555 timer IC. To create a useful project, the IC just requires a few external components. The IC has three modes of operation: oscillator, timer, and one-shot.

The IC has first launched 41 years ago and is still in use today. Its updated CMOS variant, designated 7555 and TLC555, is also available. The previous 555 was a loud chip, but the CMOS version has improved noise reduction circuitry as well as a slew of other new capabilities. The updated version also uses less power in terms of microamperes (uA), making it appropriate for battery-powered applications. In most cases, the 7555 may be used as a straight replacement for the 555.

555 Pin Layout:
555-timer-pin-layout
CMOS
A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) is the semiconductor technology used in most of today’s integrated circuits (ICs), also known as chips or microchips. CMOS transistors are based on metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) technology.
The CMOS battery powers your laptop’s BIOS firmware, which is responsible for booting up your computer and configuring data flow. You can tell if your CMOS battery has died if your laptop has difficulty booting up, if drivers disappear, and if your laptop’s date and time are incorrect.
A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) is the semiconductor technology used in most of today’s integrated circuits (ICs), also known as chips or microchips. CMOS transistors are based on metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) technology.
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