LCD-LED DisplayLights and Display Board Circuits

Lights Control for Model Cars Schematic Circuit Diagram

A Thoughtful Gift Enhanced: Adding Realistic Lights to an RC Model Car

The author presented his partner with a radio-controlled (RC) model car, bringing joy to her playtime. However, recognizing the potential for improvement, she envisioned the addition of realistic lights to enhance the experience. Driven by this idea, the author returned to his shed, ready to unleash his creativity. Armed with a soldering iron, he embarked on the task of outfitting the car with lifelike indicators, headlights, tail lights, and brake lights.

Lights Control for Model Cars Schematic Circuit Diagram

Enhancing RC Car with Realistic Lights: Circuit Overview

The core concept behind this project involves intercepting signals from the radio control receiver and utilizing a microcontroller to replicate indicators using flashing yellow LEDs and brake lights with red LEDs. Additional red LEDs serve as tail lights, while white LEDs function as headlights. To integrate the circuit seamlessly into the car’s operation, connectors JP4 and JP5 (channel 0) as well as JP6 and JP7 (channel 1) are interconnected, allowing insertion into the servo control cables for steering and the drive motor, respectively. The ATtiny45 microcontroller, powered through diode D1, interprets PWM servo signals. Buffers T1 and T2 safeguard IC1’s inputs from potential damage by buffering the servo signals.

LED Control and Configuration Process

IC1 analyzes the PWM servo signals and activates the LEDs through driver transistors. T3 controls the left indicators (yellow), T4 handles the right indicators, and T5 operates the brake LEDs (red). The red tail lights (JP2-8 and JP2-8) and the white headlights (JP2-9 and JP2-10) remain continuously illuminated. Notably, the brake lights receive a full 20 mA for increased brightness, while the tail lights only get 5 mA. For combined brake/tail functions, connecting specific pins at JP2 allows merging both lights and conserving two red LEDs.

Separate Lighting Supply and Configuration Mode

JP3 facilitates a separate lighting supply, connecting to either an additional four-cell battery pack or the primary supply for the drive motor. Resistors R8 to R17 are calibrated for use with a 4.8 V supply. JP2, a 2×10 header, serves as the connection point. Configuration mode, crucial for programming the microcontroller, requires specific steps. Jumper JP1, when attached, enables this mode. During configuration, the car’s controls are manipulated while the indicator LEDs provide feedback. Completing this process accurately ensures the system’s correct operation. If an error occurs, restarting the configuration procedure is advised for accurate settings.

RC Car Lighting Upgrade: Adding Realistic Lights and Signals

In this project, the objective was to enhance a radio-controlled (RC) model car by incorporating realistic lighting features, including indicators, headlights, tail lights, and brake lights. Achieving this required tapping into the signals from the radio control receiver and utilizing a microcontroller to simulate various lighting patterns. Key connections included paralleling connectors JP4 and JP5 (channel 0) as well as JP6 and JP7 (channel 1) for integration into the steering and drive motor servo control cables. The ATtiny45 microcontroller, powered through diode D1, decoded PWM servo signals and activated the corresponding LEDs through driver transistors.

LED Control and Configuration Process

IC1 processed the PWM servo signals to control specific LEDs. T3 managed the left indicators (yellow), T4 controlled the right indicators, and T5 operated the brake LEDs (red). The tail lights (JP2-8 and JP2-8) and headlights (JP2-9 and JP2-10) remained steadily illuminated. Notably, the brake lights received a full 20 mA for increased brightness, while the tail lights only received 5 mA. To combine brake and tail functions, specific pins at JP2 were connected, allowing the efficient use of LEDs.

Separate Lighting Supply and Configuration Mode

JP3 facilitated a separate lighting supply, connecting to either an additional four-cell battery pack or the primary supply for the drive motor. Resistors R8 to R17 were calibrated for use with a 4.8 V supply. JP2, designed as a 2×10 header, served as the primary connection point for the LEDs. Configuration mode was crucial for programming the microcontroller. During this process, jumper JP1 was engaged to enable the configuration mode. The car’s controls were then manipulated while observing the indicator LEDs, ensuring accurate configuration. If any mistakes occurred during the process, it was essential to restart the configuration procedure to ensure precise settings.

[1] www.elektor.com/090834

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