Clock & Timer Circuit Diagrams

LONG TIME DELAYED TURN-OFF TIMER SCHEMATIC CIRCUIT DIAGRAM

When B is pressed in the given circuit, the capacitor (C) is charged. When we pull the button, the current of the electrical charge accumulated on C triggers the transistor T1 and T2 through the R resistor. The transmitted T2 transistor activates the relay. After a while, the electrical load on the capacitor plates will end, the transistors go to the cut, the relay returns to its initial position and the lamp goes off.

Because the value of the resistance connected to the base of the T1 transistor is too large, the end of the line draws a very small current. This allows the capacitor to discharge for a very long time.

LONG-TIME DELAYED TURN-OFF TIME RELAY CIRCUIT DIAGRAM WITH DARLINGTON CONNECTION

ONG TIME DELAYED TURN-OFF TIME RELAY CIRCUIT DIAGRAM WITH DARLINGTON CONNECTION

Electronic circuit diagrams were extracted from various sources (pdf, doc, etc.) shared on the internet and transferred to the site. Thanks to the people who prepared the work.

A transistor is a type of semiconductor device that can be used to both conduct and insulate electric current or voltage. A transistor basically acts as a switch and an amplifier. In simple words, we can say that a transistor is a miniature device that is used to control or regulate the flow of electronic signals.
Transistors are broadly divided into three types: bipolar transistors (bipolar junction transistors: BJTs), field-effect transistors (FETs), and insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs). The standard units of a transistor for electrical measurement are Ampere (A), Volt (V), and Ohm (Ω) respectively.
The symbol of NPN and PNP is shown in the figure below. The arrow in the symbol indicates the direction of flow of conventional current in the emitter with forward biasing applied to the emitter-base junction. The only difference between the NPN and PNP transistors is in the direction of the current.

Currently, transistors are around 10-20 nanometers in scale and are expected to shrink to around 5-7 nanometers in the next few years, but that’s seemed to be about far as we can go. At that point, transistors are so small that quantum effects prevent them from working properly.
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